Saturday, December 5, 2015

Scleroderma Lung Disease (part 2 of 2)

Intersitial Lung Disease And Pulmonary Hypertension

Scarring and inflammation of the lungs is called interstitial lung disease or ILD. This can be suspected when the doctor would hear a crackling sound while examining with a stethoscope but is properly diagnosed when the lungs are tested by complete pulmonary function testing. After that, the amount of inflammation of the lungs will be measure by either a chest x-ray or a CT scan. Other processes that can be done are lung biopsy and HRCT

Pulmonary hypertension is brought about by the scarring of the lungs. Since blood vessels are attacked, blood flow to the lungs is limited causing the function of the lungs to be limited too. This in turn can also cause shortness of breath. Pulmonary hypertension is a completely different illness and should treatment for it should be different.


Since all cases of scleroderma have no known treatment yet, there is also no known cure for it, although it can still be managed. Treatment for hypertension is more focused on preventing further damage and on attempting to restore organ function to normal, although this is considerably difficult. Treatment for lung involvement in scleroderma would include medications, therapies and surgeries.

While it can be treated with medical attention, it is still very important that the patient should also handle the case responsibly on his or her own. Some things that can be done to help are to stop smoking or to avoid passive smoke if you are not a smoker. Not only can smoke worsen a condition of lung involvement in scleroderma but it can also bring about a lot of different illnesses as well. It would also help if the patient keeps a healthy lifestyle.

Scleroderma Lung Disease (part 1 of 2)


Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease which is mainly characterized as the development of scar tissue in various parts of the body. This is a result of damages caused when antibodies in the immune system attack the body’s tissues, which is contrary to its purpose of protecting the body from harmful substances. While the most common body part which is affected by scleroderma is the skin, the lungs are also quite commonly affected constituting about 80% of all cases of scleroderma.

Scleroderma lung disease and all the other complications brought about by it has emerged as the leading cause of fatalities in all cases of scleroderma. Considering that, everyone who has scleroderma should not take lung involvement lightly and should seek immediate medical attention. Lung involvement can occur in either limited or diffuse scleroderma, thus all patients with scleroderma should be aware of what could happen.

How Are The Lungs Involved In Scleroderma?

There is no known cause of scleroderma. What is known is only how scleroderma works and that it can affect a lot of organs including the lungs. Scleroderma usually starts off with the skin or the joints which called as calcinosis or Raynaud’s phenomenon. If the case goes worse, then scleroderma would begin spreading within the body. If it gets to the lungs, then that would be the beginning of lung involvement in scleroderma.

The first visible signs of scleroderma lung disease would be if you show the primary symptoms of scleroderma which is found on the skin and followed by shortness of breath and constant dry coughing without mucus. This in turn could bring about pulmonary hypertension and as well as many other lung diseases other than scleroderma.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Symptoms of Mood Swings in Men (part 2 of 2)

Symptoms of Mood Swings in Men
When men suffer from mood swings, they’re likely to display one or more of the symptoms listed below.

Unreasonable Censure
Men could consider their mood swings inexplicable but because of their nature, they will do their best to find a reason for it. Unless they’ve been properly diagnosed, they’re liable to blame others for their mood swings. Now, if there’s absolutely no other person to blame for their condition then men would usually resort to blaming themselves.

Anger and Irritability
Mood swings also make people more irritable and quicker to anger than usual. Mood swings are exhausting because it requires you to feel more than usual. One moment you’re happy, the next moment you’re down, and feeling like this several times a day certainly won’t make anyone feel good.

Creating and Avoiding Conflict
Mood swings make men feel unbalanced and unable to control their emotions. Because of this, they are more prone to create or avoid conflict, depending on the situation. If they feel they’re unable to cope with a problem then they’re likely to sweep it under the rug rather than face it head on. Then again, they can choose to alleviate their frustrations by creating conflicts instead.

Poor Sleeping Habits
Last but not the least, sleep is also affected by mood swings. Men could seek sleep excessively in order to avoid mood swings. On the other hand, men could also suffer from sleep deprivation because of mood swings.

Symptoms of Mood Swings in Men (part 1 of 2)

Women are not alone in suffering from mood swings. Men, too, can be a victim of them and when they do suffer from them, rest assured that they’ll prove to be crabbier than women with PMS.

Food, Energy, and Mood Swings
Men generally use up more energy than women because they’re more active. Food is something they consume in large quantities because it gives them the energy they need to get through the day. It allows them to play sports, perform house chores, play with the kids, and do their job.

Eating the wrong food, however, wouldn’t be able to give them the energy they need. Rather, they’ll get the opposite: foods high in fats and oils, for instance, will give them a weaker heart. They’re also prone to anxiety and irritability and definitely more liable to suffer from mood swings.

Diagnosing Mood Swings in Men
Although there are more women overall who suffer from mood swings, the pendulum actually swings to the other direction upon reaching middle age. By that time, only 25% of females suffer from mood swings compared to 40% with men. One reason for this, perhaps, is due to the absence of professional diagnosis. Mood swings and consequently depression in men are rarely detected early; statistically speaking, it takes about a decade and 3 health professionals before a proper diagnosis is achieved.

There are three good reasons why mood swings in men aren’t detected early.

Firstly, the symptoms of mood swings and depression in men are quite different from the symptoms suffered by women with the same condition. Secondly, men are less inclined to speak of their condition and their male colleagues are equally unlikely to ask for explanations. Last but not the least, sexual problems may be one of the common reasons for depression and mood swings but men rarely acknowledge its existence, much less admitting it to be a cause of their condition.