Saturday, December 5, 2015

Scleroderma Lung Disease (part 1 of 2)


Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease which is mainly characterized as the development of scar tissue in various parts of the body. This is a result of damages caused when antibodies in the immune system attack the body’s tissues, which is contrary to its purpose of protecting the body from harmful substances. While the most common body part which is affected by scleroderma is the skin, the lungs are also quite commonly affected constituting about 80% of all cases of scleroderma.

Scleroderma lung disease and all the other complications brought about by it has emerged as the leading cause of fatalities in all cases of scleroderma. Considering that, everyone who has scleroderma should not take lung involvement lightly and should seek immediate medical attention. Lung involvement can occur in either limited or diffuse scleroderma, thus all patients with scleroderma should be aware of what could happen.

How Are The Lungs Involved In Scleroderma?

There is no known cause of scleroderma. What is known is only how scleroderma works and that it can affect a lot of organs including the lungs. Scleroderma usually starts off with the skin or the joints which called as calcinosis or Raynaud’s phenomenon. If the case goes worse, then scleroderma would begin spreading within the body. If it gets to the lungs, then that would be the beginning of lung involvement in scleroderma.

The first visible signs of scleroderma lung disease would be if you show the primary symptoms of scleroderma which is found on the skin and followed by shortness of breath and constant dry coughing without mucus. This in turn could bring about pulmonary hypertension and as well as many other lung diseases other than scleroderma.

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